1                  WATER SUPPLY

 

1.1                                    Introduction

Water supply system of Shimla was established in 1875 to serve the population of 20,000. The water supply system was designed on pumping from nearby stream with the help of engineering structures. Today, water supply is one of the major impediments in the growth and development of Shimla.  This chapter provides overview of the water supply system, its delivery performance, issues and strategy for improvement in water supply.

 

1.2                                    Policy, Legal and Institutional Framework

Shimla Municipal Corporation (SMC) and Department of Irrigation and Public Health (I&PH) are responsible for water supply to Shimla city. I&PH provides treated bulk water to SMC for local supply and distribution.

The role of I&PH is development of water related infrastructures for drinking water supply schemes, sewerage systems, irrigation systems through source development, lifting water, boring of tube wells & providing distribution systems and flood protection works to protect life and property in the state.

Presently, I&PH is involved in sourcing the water, treatment of water, and transmission of water through raising and gravity mains to storage reservoirs. The I&PH is also responsible for operation and maintenance of these systems.

I&PH supplies bulk water to SMC, which in turns distributes the water to domestic and commercial connections. SMC is responsible for releasing water connections, reading of water m., billing and receipt posting besides collection of water charges, attending public grievances.

1.3                                    Sources of Water

SMC meets its water demand for Shimla city from the bulk water supply from I&PH provided at subsidized rates.  I&PH has set up pumping stations near five main sources of water with standby tube wells operated during lean period. The history of water source development for Shimla is presented in the box on next page. The details of the bulk water supply by I&PH for Shimla City are presented in Table 8.1.

 

HISTORY OF WATER SOURCE DEVELOPMENT OF SHIMLA

§         First water supply scheme: 4.54 MLD, was implemented to utilize the water from the storage reservoir of 10.92 million liters (located at 12.85 km. from Shimla), which stores water from spring sources from Dhalli Catchment Area, during 1875 to support a population of 16,000 

§         1st Augmentation  (year 1914): Subsequently, to fulfill the growing need of the city and the tourists, the first augmentation of Shimla Water Supply Scheme by provision of pump sets near Cherot Nallah (year 1889) and Jagroti Nallah (year 1914) to tap 4.80 MLD of water at source

§         2nd Augmentation (year 1914): The second augmentation of Shimla Water Supply Scheme (year 1914) was implemented by installation of 2 pump sets at Chair Nallah to tap 2.50 MLD of water at source

§         3rd Augmentation (year 1924): The third augmentation of Shimla Water Supply Scheme was commissioned during the year 1924 to tap 7.72 MLD of water from Nauti Khad with further upgradation of pumps at various stages. 

§         4th Augmentation (year 1981-82): The fourth augmentation of Shimla Water Supply Scheme was installation of pump sets at Gumma and Darabla to tap additional 16.34 MLD of water at source. Today, the system is designed to lift 24.06 MLD of water at source

§         5th Augmentation (year 1992): The fifth augmentation of Shimla Water Supply Scheme was commissioned in April 1992 designed to pump 10.80 MLD of water at two stage lifting at Ashwani Khad and at Kawalag


 

 

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 1  Details of Sources of Water for Shimla City

S.N.

Source Name / River Name

Transmission Type

Year of Start

Installed Capacity (MLD)

Quantity of Water Produced (MLD)

Supply to SMC (MLD)

 

Non Lean Period

Lean Period

 

1

Dhalli Catchment Area

Gravity

1875

4.54

1.80

0.23

0.20

 

2

Cherot / Jagroti Nallah

Pumping

1914

4.80

3.86

3.86

2.65

 

 

 

 

 

3

Chair Nallah

Pumping

1914

2.50

3.00

2.50

1.42

 

4

Nauti Khad (Gumma)

Pumping

1924& 1982

24.06

19.75

24.06

16.80

 
 
 

5

Ashwani Khad

Pumping

1992

10.06

10.80

10.80

6.30

 
 
 

 

Sub Total

 

 

 =SUM(ABOVE) 36.62

 =SUM(ABOVE) 33.55

 =SUM(ABOVE) 37.36

 =SUM(ABOVE) 24.52

 

6

Tube Wells –10 no.

 

 

 

 

 

2.63

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

30.00

 

 

The combined design capacity of the sources is45.96 MLD, although the present yield is limited to 39.21 MLD (from the five sources) due to technical problems. Presently, 27.37 MLD of treated water from main sources is supplied to SMC and 2.63 MLD from tube wells during the lean period. The total water supplied to the city is 33.00 MLD. Figure 8.1 shows the sources of water for Shimla city


 

1.4                                    Treatment of Water

The water lifted from the five main sources is treated at the source itself using rapid sand filters and chlorination before transmission by I&PH.  The treated water sample test indicates that the physicochemical quality of water is safe for drinking purposes.

 

1.5                                    Present Transmission and Storage Capacities

The treated water is conveyed to storage reservoirs by pumping at various stages though raising and gravity mains. Figure 8.2 shows the existing water supply system in Shimla. The details of the pump-sets, raising and gravity mains are presented in Table No. 8.2.

 Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 2 Details of Pumps, Raising & Gravity mains of Bulk Water Supply

S.N.

Source Name / River Name

Name of the Head Works

Total Head (m)

Head (m)

Details of Pumps and year of Installation

 
 

1

Dhalli Catchment Area

17 Sources

 

 

No pumps due to gravity

 

2

Cherot / Jagroti Nallah

Cherot Pumping Station

800

400

265 BHP (1928)

495 BHP (1963)

600 HP (1983)

600 HP (1998)

 

Jagroti Pumping Station

400

2 no. of 350 BHP (1974)

 

3

Chair Nallah

Chair Nallah

950

950

 165 HP (1913-14)

2 no. of 670 HP (1996)

 

4

Nauti Khad (Gumma)

Gumma Stage Pumping

1440

1440

1850 BHP (1963) 

3 no. 1850 BHP (1994-99)

 

1st Stage at Gumma

1440

720

4 no. of 925 BHP (1981-82)

 

2nd Stage at Darabla

720

4 no. of 925 BHP (1981-82)

 

5

Ashwani Khad

1st Stage at Ashwani Khad

965

403

4 no. of 575 BHP (1992)

 

2nd stage at Kawalag

407

4 no. of 575 BHP (1992)

 

3rd stage at Kasumpti

155

2 no. 350 BHP (1992)

 


 

 

Storage Reservoirs: The SMC is being served water from 11 major reservoirs having a total capacity of 36.95 ML.  In addition to the above 11 major reservoirs, 28 minor reservoirs having a total capacity of 5.8 ML are also available for distribution of water. The details of the storage reservoirs and its distribution network are presented in Table No. 8.3.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 3  Details of Storage Reservoirs and Distribution Network

S.N

Name of the Storage reservoir

Capacity (ml)

1

Craignano

3.00

2

Sanjauli

8.78

3

Ridge

4.63

4

Mansfield

3.63

5

Mashobra

3.00

6

Seog

10.90

7

Kasumpti

2.00

8

Kasumpti

0.22

9

Vice Regal Lodge

0.23

10

Jakhoo

0.32

11

Boileauganj

0.24

12

Total

 =SUM(ABOVE) 36.95

 

1.6                                    Local Distribution System:

The city is divided into 16 water supply distribution zones and the details of the zones are presented in Table 8.4.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 4 Details of the Zones and Areas covered under the local distribution system

Name of the Zone

Area Covered

Sanjauli

Sanjauli Bazaar, Engine Ghar, Nav Bahar, Snowdown, Jakhoo, Pumping Station, Grand Hotel, Shankli, Scandal, Sangti

Bharari

Bharari, Harvington, Kuftu, Anu, Bermu, etc

Ridge

Telegraph office, Krishna Nagar, Sabzi Mandi, Ripon, Lalpani, Western Command, Ram Bazaar, Middle bazaar

High-court

Lower High Court area, Parades Garden, Kalong, Talland

BCS

BCS, Khalini, Forest Colony

Mansfield

Mansfield to Marina, Secretariat, Chhota Shimla bazaar, Brock Hurst upto Govt. School

Kasumpti

Kasumpti Colony, Lower Brock Hurst, Patti Rehana, Patina Mehli, Pantha Ghati, Patelog

A G Office

Kaithu, Annandale, Kavi, AG Office, Ram nagar Vidhan Sabha, Chaura Maidan, Tuti Kandi, Kumar House, Raj Bhavan, Ava Lodge, Labour Bureau, Kenndy House, Win Gate

Viceregal Lodge

Institute of Advanced Studies, Tilak Nagar, Ghora Chowk, Hanuman Temple

University

University Complex, Summer Hill, Govt. Quarters, Shiva Mandir

Kamna Devi

Hill Spur of Kamna Devi, Forest Colony

Chakkar

Sandal Hill, Tara Devi, Shoghi

Tutu

Tutu Bazaar, Jutogh, Dhamida, Fatenchi

Kufri

Kufri bazaar, Holiday Resort Complex, Wild Flower, Chinni Bungalow, ITBP Colony, Fair Lawns

Mashobra

Mashobra Bazaar, Craignano, Retreat, Jungle Mashobra Sipur

Dhalli

Dhalli Bazaar, HRTC workshop, Dhingu Devi, Pumping Station for higher belt of Sanjauli area

 

The local distribution system of core area of Shimla is more than 100 years old. The new network system laid is not well interconnected to old network in absence of information on the layout of old network. The network is also characterized by heavy leakages, multiple pipes along the same alignment, network passing through natural drainages and road side drainages, crossing of network with sewerage network.

 

1.7                                    Service Coverage:

Total 41060 taps connections are provided. About 63% of the connections are private while the rest account for public connections. Water is supplied for around 60 to 90 minutes everyday in non-lean period and for around 45 minutes on alternate days during lean period. The details of water supply consumer connections are presented in Table 8.5. The details of performance indicators are tabulated in Table 8.6.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 5  Details of Consumer Connections

S.N

Head

Number of Taps

%

1

Private

25800

95.70%

2

Public

200

0.74%

3

Hand Pumps

38

0.14%

4

Tank & Others

920

3.41%

 

Total

 =SUM(ABOVE) 26958

100.00%

 


 

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 6  Water Supply Performance Indicators

S.N.

Indicator

Current Situation

1

Per Capita Supply at production end during lean period (LPCD)

94

2

Per Capital Supply at consumer end during lean period (LPCD)

47

3

T & D losses/ Total Supply

>30%

4

Supply Frequency

45 minutes on alternate days in lean period and 90 minutes daily on non-lean period

5

Storage Capacity Adequacy ratio (% of Net supply)

123%

 

 

1.8                                    Water Demand and Deficit

1.8.1          Present Water Demand

The present water requirement per day for Shimla City during peak tourist season for a total population of 2,84,635 @ 140 lpcd is 39.85 MLD as against the supply of 33 MLD. Thus, there is deficit of water supply of about 7 MLD, which increases to 17 MLD during summer due to shortfall because of failure of snow or rain in previous winter. Therefore, the average shortfall in water supply is 12 MLD as on today.

 

1.8.2         Future Water Demand

At current growth of existing and floating population, the water requirement of Shimla City and its surrounding areas is expected to be 105.66 MLD for the horizon year 2037, which creates a huge gap between present supply and expected demand. To bridge this gap between the future water demand of 105.66 MLD and present water supply of 33 MLD, 72.66 MLD of water has to be sourced. The estimation of water requirement is presented in Table 8.7.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 7 Estimation of Future Water Demand

Nature of Population

Total Population (no.)

Rate of consumption (liters/day)

Water Requirement Million (liters/day)

Permanent Population

415497

150

62.32

Floating Population

239398

100

23.94

General requirement for various purposes other than residents.

a) Schools 48 no. @ 450 students / school

21600

45

0.97

b) Community Centres 21 no. @ 200 each

4200

45

0.19

c) 3 Service Industries @ 100 vehicles each

300

45

0.01

d) Zonal Commercial Centres 3 no. @ 1500 each

4500

45

0.20

e) Hospitals 9 no. with 100 bed each

900

450

0.41

f) Colleges 6 no. with average strength 800 students each

4800

45

0.22

g) Special Public Institutions 8 no. @ 1000 each

8000

45

0.36

h) Cantonment area

3000

150

0.41

i) Multipurpose Cultural complexes

250

45

0.01

j) Railway stations 3 no. for 1st-6000, II-2000 & III-1000

9000

45

0.41

k) Parking-cum-commercial areas 5 no. @ 50 each

250

45

0.01

l) University Complex 1No.

5000

150

0.75

m) Milk processing plant optimum capacity 100001st. Milk. (Complex Processing)

10000

10

0.10

 

 

Sub Total

90.30

Adding for wastage @ 2% for backwashing of filter beds

 

 

1.81

Adding 15% on account of losses in conveyance mains etc

 

 

13.55

 

 

Grand Total

105.66

Water available from existing schemes

 

 

33

Net water requirement for the year 2037

 

 

 72.66

Source: I&PH Department

 

1.9                                    Water Charges

The water charges notified by SMC for domestic and commercial connections are classified based on the quantity of water consumed under different slabs.  Table 8.8 presents the water charges in Shimla City.  In 2003, the water charges were revised from flat rates to slab rates and since then, the charges are revised annually over past three years. One time connection fee of Rs. 2,000/-and Rs. 5,000/- are collected for new domestic, and commercial connections respectively.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 8  Municipal Water Charges

Type of Connection

 

Usage 1000 Liter per month

Charges (Rs. per 1000 litre)

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Upto 06.10.03

After 06.10.03

upto 06.10.04

After 06.10.04

Till date

Residential

0-30

2.50

3.50

3.50

3.85

3.85

30-75

2.50

5.00

5.00

5.50

5.50

>75

2.50

7.50

7.50

8.25

8.25

Commercial

0-30

10.50

15.00

15.00

16.50

16.50

30-75

10.50

20.00

20.00

22.00

22.00

>75

10.50

27.50

27.50

30.25

30.25

Construction

>0

NA

NA

NA

30.25

30.25

 

1.10                                Cost of Water and Subsidy on Water

The main source of funding for urban water supplies is by charging the end user of water. I&PH, which produces water at Rs. 35 per KL, supplies SMC bulk water at the rate of Rs. 8.80 per KL.  SMC is charging Rs. 3.85 per KL of water for domestic purposes even though SMC incurs an additional cost of Rs. 6.50 per KL towards operation and maintenance costs. Table 8.9 indicates that there is subsidy of the 90.72 % in urban water supply of Shimla.

Table  STYLEREF 1 \s 1. SEQ Table \* ARABIC \s 1 9  Water Cost and Water Charges

S. N.

Description

Cost (Rs. per 1000 L)

1

Production cost of water incurred by I&PH department

35.00

2

Supply of Bulk water to SMC

8.80

3

Subsidy rate for Bulk Water Supply (Item 1- Item 2)

26.20

4

Operation and Maintenance Costs incurred by SMC

6.50

5

Water Charges for domestic water supply

3.85

6

Cost Incurred by SMC (Item 2 + Item 4)

15.30

7

Subsidy rate for domestic water supply (Item 6 – Item 5)

11.45

8

Total Cost of Production of Water (Item 1+ Item 4)

41.50

9

Total Subsidy (Item 3 + Item 7)

37.65

 

% Subsidy

90.72%

 

 

1.11                                Unaccounted for Water

Unaccounted for Water (UFW) due to physical and administrative losses in the system, lead to loss of revenue. Physical losses are due to leakage from old, damaged, corroded pipe lines/ connections and leaking joints and overflow at overhead tanks. Public taps also cause significant waste of treated water.  Administrative losses are due to theft, illegal tapping of water-unregistered connections, faulty m. and unrecorded supply due to poor records and billing errors. The study conducted by National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) in 1986 established the leakages more than 45%.

In order to reduce leakages and improve performance of existing system, there is a need to conduct a leak detection study of the water supply network and develop sufficient and reliable database regarding the water supply systems. Good information base, willingness to follow-up on systematic replacement of leaking pipes, defective meters and connections as well as tariff revisions, etc are critical to the success of the water supply scheme.

Water Supply through tanker Lorries: The hotels and restaurants in Shimla City have engaged private tanker lorries to tap spring water or water from nallahs in neighbouring areas.  The consultation with hoteliers engaged in such practice, indicated that the cost for availing such water is about Rs. 3000 per month to meet their water requirements.  This shows the affordability to pay for water.

 

1.12                                Issues and Aspects

·        Inadequate Water Sources: The available water sources as listed in Table 8.1 have been tapped to the maximum extent possible. All water sources available nearby have been utilized and present water sources are inadequate. One of the water sources available in abundance nearby is River Satluj, which is found to be not suitable due to heavy silt content.  Therefore, there is need to explore and develop additional water sources to meet the current and future water demand

·        Leakage of Water: Physical and administrative losses to the extent of more than 35% causes revenue loss, and it is one of the reason for inadequate water supply at tail end in certain areas

·        Service delivery: Only 57% of the households in Shimla Planning Area have private water supply pipe connections. The distribution time is only 45 to 90 minutes and depends upon the water pressure in the network. The supply is also characterized by low pressure 

·        Cost of Production of Water: The cost of production of water incurred by I&PH is Rs. 35 per 1000 litre is very high. This is due to high energy cost to raise water to head of about 1470 m.

·        Heavy subsidy on Water Supply: The cost of production of water and water charges from end users in Shimla does not match.  The water supply has been highly subsidized to the extent of 90.72 % for domestic water.  The subsidy is very high for urban water supply. Also, the water charge of SMC is not commensurate with operation and maintenance cost of water supply systems

·        Loss of Revenue due to merger of Special Area: SMC used to collect Rs. 13 per KL for water supply to areas outside municipal limits. With merger of three special areas of Dhalli, Tutu, New Shimla in municipal limits, the SMC will have to charge notified rates as result causing loss of revenue from water supply

1.13                                Vision and Goals

 

Text Box: “Provision of Adequate Quantity of Safe Water to all”

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

DESCRIPTION

2006

2011

2016

2021

Water supply liters per capita per day (Average)

100

150

150

150

Transmission and distribution losses (%)

>30

20

10

10

% Population Covered

90

100

100

100

% Area Covered

90

100

100

100

Total supply/ storage capacity

1.23

>1

>1

>1

No. of hours of supply (Lean Period)

0.75

1

1.5

2

Treatment capacity

100

100

100

100

 

1.14                                Strategy and Identification of Interventions

The water supply system for Shimla is unbundled system as:

Ø      Bulk Water Supply: Bulk Water Supply would comprise of abstraction of water from source, treatment and transmission to the bulk consumers

Ø      Local Supply: Local supply would comprise of distribution, supply of water to end consumer, billing and collection of revenue

A phased approach is to be implemented simultaneously to remove the operational efficiencies and meet the water demand. The Phase 1 shall provide short-term solution of augmenting water supply through realization of additional water through reduction in losses. The Phase 1 would involve improving the performance of existing system through rehabilitation and upgradation. The Phase II shall address the augmentation of water supply through exploration of new sources like river Pabbar to meet medium and long-term requirements.

 

Rehabilitation and Upgradation of main water distribution network of Shimla Planning Area

Rehabilitation of entire water production, transmission and distribution system is warranted with an objective of reducing losses, improving water quality and pressure. It would also include enhancing coverage to slum areas, public standposts and conversion of un-authorized connections to authorized connections.

The incremental revenue generation due to efficiency gain can offset the revenue loss from merger of special areas and may be leveraged to raise the investment required for expansion and augmentation.

 

Augmentation of water supply distribution system for SADA Areas

Augmentation of water supply and distribution system is required for provision of water supply to newly merged areas of Dhalli, New Shimla and Tutu and special areas of Ghanahatti, Kufri, and Shoghi. This shall include provision of water storage system and laying of new distribution pipelines.

 

Augmentation of Water Sources

The water demand of Shimla for year 2021 and 2037 is 62.78 MLD and 105.66 MLD respectively. To meet the water demand of Shimla city, the following interventions are identified:

a.       Augmentation of existing water source from Nauti Khad

b.      Augmentation of water supply scheme for Shimla city from river Giri

c.       Sourcing of water from river Pabbar

 

GoHP has undertaken augmentation scheme for Nauti Khad and River Giri for implementation as an immediate and short-term measure.

 

Rainwater Harvesting

In order to tackle the water scarcity problem of Shimla, the strategy should aim at conservation of water through rooftop rainwater harvesting and creation of water bodies/storage tanks at suitable locations along the hill slopes through construction of check dams. Roof top rainwater has been made mandatory in new buildings and hotel through local bylaws.

 

Water Monitoring Cell

I&PH and SMC shall have a specialized wing for monitoring of water supply that shall carry out regular undertake water loss monitoring through leak detections and surveillance of administrative losses. This shall go a long way in prevention of loss of water. Water monitoring cell should be provided with automation system including conducting GIS survey and mapping, digital control panels, electronic bulk m., sluice valves, digital display system etc.

1.15                                Proposed Implementation Framework

 

In order to improve efficiency and attract private investment, it is recommended that GoHP and SMC implement water management programme for Shimla on Public Private Partnership format through Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV).

The SPV shall develop and implement projects by entering through separate EPC and O&M contracts/Management Contract/ Service Contract with private sector.

 

The Phase 1 related to rehabilitation of existing system may be implemented on the short-term management contract of 5 years for management with rehabilitation investment from SPV with eligible grant-in-aid support from GoI and GoHP. The management contract shall address the following:

Ø      Identifying short-term measures to improve efficiency

Ø      Undertake condition assessment

Ø      Formulate and implement programme for improvement of service levels

Ø      Training of staff in operation and maintenance of the water supply system

Ø      Oversight EPC contractor appointed for undertaking rehabilitation and expansion programme

Subsequently, SPV can induct operator on long-term contract for management, operation and maintenance of the system.

The Pabbar River Based Bulk Water Supply Scheme can be structured on Separate EPC and O&M Contract.

The SPV should be responsible for project development and induction of private sector contractors and/or operators for implementation, supervision and monitoring of project.


 

 

1.16                                Sectoral Investment Plan

The investment plan for Integrated Water Supply Project for Shimla Planning Area to meet the mid term (year 2021) demand and to be sufficient enough to cater to the long term (year 2036) need is tabulated below. The cost for each of the interventions is based on the preliminary cost estimates prepared by various engineering departments, which does not include land acquisition cost. The land acquisition requirement and costs shall be finalized based on the Detailed Project Reports and the investment plan shall be suitably finalized.

   (in Rs. Lakhs)

S.N.

Project

Total Cost

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

1

Technical Studies: Master Plans, DPRs and Energy Audit Studies

500

50

200

100

100

50

-

2

Rainwater harvesting and water conservation

240

120

120

-

-

-

-

3

Augmentation of water supply scheme for Shimla City from River Pabbar

57954

 

5797

15000

25000

12157

4

Rehabilitation of water supply transmission and distribution network and augmentation/extension of distribution network

6563

700

2200 

2700

963 

8

Water Monitoring Cell

300

100

100

100

-

-

-

 

Total

65557

970

8417

17900

26063

12207

-

 


 

1.17                                Project Information Sheets

 

Project Title: Rain Water Harvesting through Roof Top and Check Dams

 

Project Description: Rain Water Harvesting is proposed through rooftop measures for buildings and creation of water for storages by checkdams along the nallahs. The rooftop measures shall be implemented for government and other public buildings in Shimla Municipal Corporation and Special Areas The components of the project shall include construction of storage tanks and related piping work

 

Project Benefits:

-         Increases water availability

-         Provides control over water source

-         Stored rain water from roof tops can be used directly for flushing wash rooms and gardening

-         Can be source for water for fire hydrants in building premises

 

Project Cost: Rs. 240 Lakhs

Implementation Structure:

 

The project shall be implemented by GoHP through I&PH and PWD with financing from GoI under JNNURM

Preparatory Activity for Implementation:

 

 

Related Programme, Plan and Policies:

 

Need to create awareness through awareness generation and commitment campaign for ensuring effective implementation and long-term sustenance of the initiative.

 

Additional Studies:

 

Assessment of sites for creation of water bodies, the usage and distribution system

 

 


 

 

Project Title: Augmentation of Water Supply Scheme for Shimla City from River Pabbar

 

Project Description: To source 52 MLD of water from river Pabbar by I&PH. The project shall include construction of intake weir, sedimentation tank, sump well, pump house, treatment plant, filtration plant, pumping stations, rising and gravity mains etc.

 

Project Benefits:

-         Increases water availability

 

Project Cost:  Rs. 57954 Lakhs

 

Revenue Sources: Water user charges collected by SMC

 

Implementation Structure: I&PH/SPV shall be responsible for execution of the required works through EPC contract

 

Financing Mechanism: Capital cost to be financed by I&PH/SPV using funds to be raised through grant under JNNURM

 

Time Frame

Project Development: 2007-2008

Implementation: 2008-2011

 

Institutional Responsibility: I&PH/SPV

 

Preparatory Activity for Implementation:

Project development including preparation of detailed feasibility and detailed project report.

 

Related Programme, Plan and Policies:

 

Revision in water tariff would be required in order to make water supply provisioning sustainable.

 

Additional Studies:

-         Detailed Project Report for augmentation of water source from river Pabbar


 

 

Project Title: Rehabilitation of water transmission and distribution network and augmentation/extension of distribution network

 

Project Description: The project components shall include

(1)    Metering: Installation of flow/ bulk m. and m. at consumers end (existing and new areas as covered above), and their maintenance for specified number of years (say 5 years)

(2)    Leakage Reduction: Detection and reduction of physical water leakages through repair or replacements of network pipelines and ferrules and pipelines for consumer connections

(3)    Un-authorized Connections: Assessment of numbers of un-authorized connections, their location and volume of water consumed; replacing unauthorized connections with authorized connections, where required

(4)    Connections to Slums: Provide individual or shared connections to slums (slum population is around 10% of total population), public stand-posts, etc. as required

(5)    Water Treatment Plant Rehabilitation: Rehabilitation of existing WTPs including repair/ replacement of pumps, motors, electrical equipment, inlet works, treatment works, civil works, etc.

(6)    Replacement of the internal water pipe line of the distribution system

(7)    Provision for additional service reservoir extension of distribution network to periurban areas

 

Project Benefits:

-         Reduces transmission and distribution losses

-         Increases coverage of the distribution network

-         Increases the capacity of the distribution network

-         Improves the credibility of the water charges collection system

Project Cost:  Rs. 6863 Lakhs

 

Revenue Sources: Revenue from increased water realized through leakage reduction

 

Implementation Structure: SMC/SPV shall be responsible for the execution of the required works through EPC contract

 

Financing Mechanism: Capital cost to be financed by the SMC/SPV using funds to be raised through grant under JNNURM; O&M cost to be borne by SMC/SPV

 

Time Frame:  Project Development : 2006 ; Implementation  :2007- 2010

 

Institutional Responsibility: I&PH and SMC/SPV

 

Preparatory Activity for Implementation:

Project development including preparation of DPR

 

Related Programme, Plan and Policies:

 

Additional Studies:

-         Preparation of the Comprehensive Water Supply Master Plan for Shimla Planning Area which shall include:

§         Non revenue water assessment using of flow m. to assess volume of water produced and consumed/ lost at various points in the system

§         Assessment of numbers of un-authorized connections

§         Energy audit studies